Christmas & Easter

Spring Pie With Asparagus and Smoked Salmon

Spring Pie With Asparagus and Smoked Salmon

Ingredients

Pie shell
3 dl wheat flour from Kungsörnen
1 tiny pich of salt
100 g butter
1-2 tbsp cold water

Filling
1 bunch of fresh asparagus
1 bunch of fresh, thin carrots
A few spring onions
150 g feta cheese
300 g hot smoked salmon

Egg mix
3 eggs
1 ½ dl cream
1 ½ dl milk
250 g grated cheese such as Västerbottensost
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Topping
Fresh cress

 

This delicious pie with fresh veggies, feta cheese and hot smoked salmon is perfect for the easter buffet or lunch on warm summer days.

Turn on the oven to 200C (gas mark 6).
Mix flour, salt and butter to a crumble. Add water and knead into a dough. Press out the dough in to a pie tin (approx. 24 cm in diametre) and prick some holes with a fork.
Place some tin foil around the edges of the pie shell to prevent the dough from disformning when baked. Bake in the middle of the oven for approx. 10 min. Take it out of the oven and remove the tin foil.
Cook the carrots and asparagus in lightly salted water for a couple of minutes. Cool down and cut the carrots lenght wise.
Cut the spring onions fine and spread it along with cut up feta cheese and pieces of salmon in the pie shell.
Whisk together the egg mix ingredients and pour it in to the pie shell. Arrange the asparagus and carrots on the top.
Bake in the middle of the oven for approx. 20-30 min, or when the top is golden in colour.
Take the pie out of the oven and decorate with fresh cress before serving.

The recipe and photo are borrowed from Kungsörnen

 

 

Ris à la Malta

Ris à la Malta

Ingredients

Serves 4

2 dl whipping cream
2 tbsp caster sugar
500 g cooked Swedish rice porridge
1 tbsp vanilla sugar
3 oranges
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 pomegranate (optional)
Sweet fruit sauce (Saftsås), (optional).

 

Ris à la Malta is a classic Swedish Christmas dessert (that has no connection what to so ever to Malta), made with rice porridge and oranges with flavours of vanilla and cinnamon.
This dish - despite the name - has no connection to Malta. The name is though to come from the Danish Risalamande, which in turn comes from the French Riz à l'amande = Rice with almond.
 

Whisk the cream with the sugar. Mix it with the cooked rice. Peel the organges with an knife and cut away the skin. Cut the fileted orange segments in to smaller pieces. Mix the oranges with the porridge and cream mix. Place in serving bowls. Top with orange pieces and pommegrante kernels (optional). Top with a little cinnamon powder.
In some Nordic countries, and in parts of Sweden it's traiditonal to serve the Ris à la Malta with Sweet fruit sauce (Saftsås), (optional).

Rice porridge is a traditional breakfast on Christmas eve morning in Sweden. It's served hot in a serving dish which contains one almond. The person who ends up with the almond in his/her bowl gets to make a wish.
Any left over rice from the breakfast is perfect to make Ris à la Malta for dessert on Christmas Day.

 

Christmas Knäck and sweets

Christmas Knäck and sweets

Ingredients

Swedish knäck - caramel toffee

makes approx. 60-80 knäck

1 dl sugar
1 dl whipping cream
1 dl Swedish light syrup (ljus sirap)
3 tsp. butter
1/2 dl almonds, finely chopped (optional)
80 mini (1-inch) mini paper cases for sweets

 

 

Making your own Christmas sweets is fun and a welcome treat for friends and family. Swedish knäck is a yummy caramel toffee, and in Sweden it's a must have at Christmas.

Combine the sugar, whipping cream, light syrup, and butter in a large pot (the sides should be a least 12 inches high, since the mixture will boil up). Over low heat, bring the mixture to a low but steady boil, stirring just until the butter has melted. Stop stirring, and allow the mixture to boil (again, at low heat) for 30 minutes. Place the paper cases on a very lightly greased baking sheet.
At the 20 or 25 minute point, transfer a teaspoon of the mixture to a cup of cold water. If it flattens itself out on the surface rather than forming a "soft ball," it's ready. Fold in the almonds (optional), then transfer to the paper cases. The mixture is very hot, so please take care not to burn yourself!
Transfer the tray of knäck to the refrigerator and allow to cool overnight. Transfer to an airtight container and store in the refrigerator until use, (this makes it easier to peel the paper wrappers away from the knäck).

Tips!
• If you prefer your knäck harder, cook for a further 10 minutes.
• Experiment with flavouring your knäck with, for example, vanilla sugar, gingerbread spices, coffee, cocao powder, dessicated coconut or crushed Turkisk peppar liquorice sweets.

ALMOND PASTE & CHOCOLATE BALLS
Mix almond paste (mandelmassa) with a little green food colouring. Roll into small balls. Dip one end of each ball into melted dark chocolate. Place the balls on a baking sheet and allow the chocolate to cool before serving.

RASPBERRY JELLIES WITH CHOCOLATE
Dip raspberry jellies (geléhallon) in to melted dark chocolate. Stand on a baking sheet and allow the chocolate to cool before serving.

 

 

Gingersnaps

Gingersnaps

Ingredients

160 Gingersnaps

200 g (7 oz) brown sugar
200 g (7 oz) white sugar
200 g (7 oz) dark corn syrup
150 ml (¾ cup) water
300 g (10 oz) butter
2 tbs ground cinnamon
2 tbs ground ginger
2 tbs ground cloves
1 tbs baking soda
0.9–1 kg (2−2¼ lb) flour

Swedish Gingersnaps (Pepparkakor) is a traditional biscuit loved by the whole family. Top tip! Top your gingersnaps with a slice of Västerbottensost cheese and a small dollop of lingonberry jam. Perfect served with Swedish glögg, mulled wine, at your Lucia or Christmas party.

Preparation
To make gingersnaps, heat the brown sugar, white sugar, corn syrup and water in a pot. Add the butter and let it melt. Stir and let cool slightly, then blend in the spices and baking soda. Then mix in the flour to a smooth consistency. Sprinkle a little flour on top and put the dough out to cool, preferably overnight. Take the dough and knead it smooth on a baking table, adding more flour if desired. Roll it thin and cut into shapes, using the desired cookie cutters. Bake in the oven (180°C/Gas mark 4) for 8–10 minutes. Let the gingersnaps cool on the baking sheet.

The recipe is borrowed from Sweden.se  sweden.se/culture-traditions/collection/welcome-to-the-swedish-kitchen) On their website you'll find several receipes for traditional Swedish food dishes.

The photo is borrowed from Kungsörnen. We stock their baking flours in our stores.

 

Jansson's Temptation

Jansson's Temptation

Ingredients

Jansson’s Temptation (Janssons frestelse) is a creamy potato and anchovy casserole − is said to have been named after Pelle Janzon, a food-loving Swedish opera singer who died in 1889. The recipe was published for the first time 40 years later, and this rich casserole quickly became a classic of the Swedish Christmas dinner table. But Jansson’s temptation can just as easily be eaten at any time of year.

Serves 6-8

1.2 kg potatoes
400 g onions
375 g spice-cured sprat filets
600 ml heavy whipping cream
salt, white pepper
breadcrumbs
butter

The receipe is borrowed from Sweden.se and the photo is borrowed from Semiswede.

 

 

Preheat the oven to 200 C/Gas mark 6). Peel the potatoes and cut them into strips. Peel and cut the onions into thin slices, sautéing them gently in a little butter without browning. Grease an ovenproof baking dish and cover the bottom with a layer of potatoes, then add half the onions and half the sprat (‘anchovy’) filets. Another layer of potatoes, then the rest of the onion and sprats. Finish with a layer of potatoes. Flatten the surface, apply a few turns of pepper fresh from the mill and sprinkle on a little salt. Pour the cream on until it is almost visible through the potatoes. Place a few pats of butter on top and, if desired, sprinkle with some breadcrumbs. Bake in the middle of the oven for about an hour.

Lucia Buns

Lucia Buns

Ingredients

25 buns

1 g (1/28 oz) saffron threads
50 g (2 oz) yeast
200 g (7 oz) sugar
300 ml (1½ cup) milk
1 egg
150–200 g (5–7 oz) butter
1 tsp salt
750 g (26 oz) flour
100 g (3½ oz) raisins
Glaze:
1 egg
2 tbs water

 

 

 

Lucia Buns are, as the name suggests, traditionallay eaten at Lucia celebrations on 13 December. These fragrant saffron buns are delicius with a coffee, hot chocolate or Glögg, Swedish mulled wine.  The annual candlelit Lucia procession on 13 December is perhaps one of the more exotic-looking Swedish customs, with girls and boys clad in white full-length gowns singing songs together. Among the youngest, anyone can be Lucia; as the children get older, the competition will harden. Learn more about Lucia from Sweden.se's website: sweden.se/culture-traditions/lucia/

To make Lucia Buns, or ‘Lucia cats’ (lussekatter), as they're often called, grind the saffron along with a cube of sugar, using a mortar and pestle. (For those who think ahead: drip a little cognac on top, and let stand a few days.) Crumble the yeast in a bowl and stir in a few tablespoons of milk. Melt the butter and pour on the milk. Add the rest of the ingredients, except the raisins, and knead the dough in a dough mixer for 10 minutes. Carefully mix in most of the raisins, cover the dough and let it rise for 30 minutes at room temperature. Divide the dough into 25 pieces and roll the buns in an oblong shape, about 10 cm (4 in) long. Cover them and let rest for 10 minutes, then roll them twice as long and twist the ends of each bun in opposite directions to form a sort of figure 8. Put one raisin in the middle of each half figure 8. Place on a greased baking sheet and let rise under a towel for about 90 minutes, or until the buns have doubled in size. Bake in the oven (220°C/Gas mark 7) for 5 minutes. Beat together the egg and water, brush the mixture on the buns. Allow to cool on the baking sheet.

 

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